Painting stucco may be a difficult task to do. This is because stucco is made of powdered limestone or cement that is mixed with sand and water until it meets a mortar-like consistency which makes it have an uneven texture; thus, difficult to paint. But stucco is a great alternative as a home exterior because of its durability making it last for a long time. With that said, painting stucco can be worth all your time, patience, and concentration as long as you do it the right way. And that is why here we are.

Before we start the step-by-step guide, here is the list of tools that you might need in the whole process:

  • Putty Knife
  • Painter’s Tape
  • Masonry Primer
  • Masonry Paint
  • Roller Grid
  • Large-nap paint roller
  • Paintbrush

Here is the step-by-step guide of how to paint stucco:

1. Let it Rest

In case your stucco is just recently applied, give it enough time (At least 2 months) to dry fully before you start making any improvements. By doing so, the stucco will be able to be stable before painting it. It’s best to avoid touching it. If you live in an area where it frequently rains, you should consider giving it additional 1-2 weeks to dry. 

2. Inspect 

Once it’s dry, check for any imperfections. Imperfections may be stained, crumbled, or peeled spots of the stucco. Note any of these to repair it later. In case the imperfection/s is minimal, put on a visible mark to avoid forgetting it. 

3. Repair 

After inspecting the stucco, repair the flawed areas. For the small cracks, you can fill it by running the tip of the caulk gun loaded with elastomeric caulk along the crack. For larger cracks, remove any loose debris with a putty knife first before filling it with a dry stucco repair product that may be mixed with water, depending on the direction of the package. 

4. Pressure-wash

To completely clean the stucco, pressure-wash it after a month or half of the repair. This will remove all the dust, grime, mold, and other dirt that has build-up on the stucco. Just make sure to avoid directing it to other surfaces like windows and make sure to lower the pressure setting. 

5. Let it Dry

After pressure-washing the stucco, wait patiently for it to dry completely. 

By doing all of that, you are already done prepping the stucco for the paint. The following things are what you should do next:

1. Pick the Right Masonry Paint

In choosing the right masonry paint, not only you have to choose your preferred color but also consider which masonry paint can comply with all the conditions and needs of the surface you are painting. You can find masonry paint at your local hardware store, home improvement center, and even at the aisles of superstores. 

2. Mask the Unwanted Areas

Use the painter’s tape to mask off all the unwanted areas such as door frames, window ledges, and more. Make sure to put drop cloth or tarp in case the stucco is connected with a walkway and such. 

3. Pour the Paint in a Large Bucket

Find a bucket to put your paint where your rollers can be accommodated. Just pour enough paint to avoid wasting it. 

4. Paint

This is the fun part. Use the rollers and glide it back and forth onto the stucco. Overlap and use vertical and horizontal strokes to ensure optimum coverage. 

5. Fill any gaps

With a paintbrush, carefully fill any areas that you might have missed and areas that are hard to reach. 

6. Let it Dry

The drying time may vary depending on the brand of your paint. In case you want to apply a second layer, do it the next day to make sure it’s fully dry. 

7. Apply the Second Coat

Stucco is a great holder of paint and that is why even a single coat may satisfy you. But in case you want to apply another, make sure to keep it thin to avoid covering the natural texture of the stucco. 

8. Let it Dry and Cure

The second coat will most likely dry just within a day but it may take a whole month to cure completely. Within these times, make sure to avoid touching the surface to avoid unwanted fingerprints and smudges. 

Though these look a bit tiresome, it surely is worth all your time, money, and effort. If this is done successfully you can expect long-lasting, durable protection that will not let your stucco experience any scratches, moisture, and temperature-related damage for years.